March 5, 2024

Johnie Lavere

High Tech Solutions

The Build-A-Bigger-Cloud-Computer Game

Introduction

Clouds are everywhere in our lives. We use them on a regular basis, and most of us barely think about them unless something goes wrong with their internet connection or they suddenly go down. But what exactly is a cloud? How does it work? What exactly is on those clouds? And why do we even need them in the first place? These are all questions that I will attempt to answer here!

The build-a-bigger-cloud game is a fun way to demonstrate and teach cloud computing concepts.

The Build-A-Bigger-Cloud game is a fun way to demonstrate and teach cloud computing concepts. It can be played by people of all ages, in small groups or large ones. The game was created by [developers](https://www.amazon.com/Build-Bigger-Computer-Game/dp/B00GCZW1J0) at Amazon Web Services (AWS).

You’ll need a few supplies and some space to spread out, but you can make all these things from scratch.

  • A computer
  • A monitor or TV to display the game on
  • A keyboard and mouse (or a controller if you’re playing on a console)
  • Some space to spread out and put your stuff in, like a bedroom or office with lots of empty floor space.

Here’s what you’ll need to get started:

Here are the things you’ll need to get started:

  • A cloud-shaped structure made out of newspaper or cardboard, with a hole in the middle for the sun. You can use whatever kind of material you like; just make sure it’s big enough for your balloon (or other moving clouds) to fit through!
  • A balloon made up of sponge or cotton wool, representing moving clouds.

1. A cloud-shaped structure, made out of newspaper or cardboard, with a hole in the middle for the sun.

  • A cloud-shaped structure, made out of newspaper or cardboard, with a hole in the middle for the sun.
  • You can decorate your cloud however you want! Paint it yellow if you’d like to make it look like a real cloud (and also so that it won’t be mistaken for an alien spaceship). You could also use markers or stickers to add some fun decorations on top of your creation–but make sure they’re not going to fall off in the rain!

2. A balloon (or something else) made up of sponge or cotton wool to represent moving clouds (it doesn’t have to be a cloud).

  • A balloon (or something else) made up of sponge or cotton wool to represent moving clouds (it doesn’t have to be a cloud).

You can use cotton balls, cotton wool, or even an old sock stuffed with polyester fiberfill if you don’t have access to these items. The most important thing is that it has some give when you squeeze it and is lightweight enough for the fan’s wind power to push around easily.

3. Tape or glue to put all your pieces together once they are built (you may also want some scissors if you’re using paper).

  • Tape or glue to put all your pieces together once they are built (you may also want some scissors if you’re using paper).

Tape is great for sticking things together, but it doesn’t hold very well. If you use tape on your cloud computer, make sure not to tear the paper! Glue works better because it holds things in place stronger than tape does. However, before using glue on your cloud computer, make sure that it’s completely dry first so that no messes will happen with its wetness later on down the road when we add water inside our computers later on down this article series!

4. Something that represents raindrops – small balls of cotton wool will work just fine here too.

  • The cloud is the infrastructure that supports your computer, and it’s also a metaphor for the internet.
  • In this game, you’ll be building your own cloud computer!
  • The sun represents your client program (like Word or Chrome) and it sends requests to the server through TCP/IP protocol.
  • Your goal is to build a bigger, better cloud computer than other players by adding more storage space and processing power.

When we talk about clouds in the context of computer science, we mean an environment where applications are hosted remotely by third parties and accessed via standard protocols such as HTTP(S)

When we talk about clouds in the context of computer science, we mean an environment where applications are hosted remotely by third parties and accessed via standard protocols such as HTTP(S). Cloud computing is a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction.

Conclusion

The build-a-bigger-cloud game is a fun way to demonstrate and teach cloud computing concepts. You can use this activity with students of all ages, from kindergarteners all the way up through high school seniors who are studying computer science.